More About Logic

MAKING LOGIC HARDER THAN IT IS

It sometimes seems that no one wants to keep life simple. Some people use logic as a way to make others wonder what they are talking about so that people think they are smarter than they are? Logic has it’s own jargon, words that mean one thing in real life but mean something different when talking about logic. It has terms like syllogism, premises, deduction, inductions, etc.

Basic Terms and Rules of Logic

CAUTION

Logic is very limited as you have already read. It is supposed to sort out truth from fiction, but it is often used to confuse and deceive by either starting with something that is not true or by inserting something that is not true in the process of logic. There are problems with logic and reasoning. Here is a song that may help you understand.

THREE LAWS

There are three classical laws of logic. These three laws seem so obvious that they wouldn’t need to be stated, but they are violated by intellectuals all the time. Here they are in everyday language: it is what it is, two mutually exclusive things can’t both be true, and there is no compromise between two mutually exclusive things. Here is an example of how they work: God is God and is not something else. He can’t both exist and not exist, and there is no middle ground between claims of His existence as opposed to claims of His non-existence. It’s amazing how confused intelligent people get when they violate the three laws.

INDUCTIVE VERSUS DEDUCTIVE REASONING

Inductive logic seems to make sense, but it can be exactly wrong.Here are some other things you should know. Language plays a key role in understanding. A type of reasoning known as Inductive reasoning can be very deceptive in that it takes specific examples or pieces of evidence and tries to construct a story (sometimes called a hypothesis or theory) to fit them, and these stories, or explanations of the evidence, can become very creative and fanciful as in the case of particles-to-people-evolutionism, atheism, billions of years, big bang, abiogenesis, and many of the politically correct ideas. What is even more deceptive is when inductive reasoning is used as the basis for deductive reasoning. Conclusions derived by inductive reasoning cannot be uses as premises for deductive reasoning. They are not true in a real sense. They are only possible (or sometimes impossible like particles-to-people).Deductive reasoning is supposed to be more sure than inductive reasoning, but it is not at all sure if the premise, or proof, is based on inductive reasoning. This deceptive technique is used in science classes that teach particles-to-people-evolutionism, atheism, billions of years, big bang, abiogenesis, and many of the politically correct ideas. The examples of unsound reasoning abound in schools, in movies, on TV, in news media, in songs, and especially in blogs and social media.

Syllogisms

Syllogisms are deductive and contain one or more premise statements plus one, and only one, conclusion statement. Here is the most important fact about syllogisms and all thinking. Most people don’t base their beliefs on rational thought. Sales people know that people don’t really tend to make decisions of whether or not to buy something...

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The Basic Terms and Rules of Logic

If the terms, such as statement, premise, conclusion, or logical argument are new to you, you may have to read through the bullet points below several times to understand them. Logic = a limited but powerful tool to try to determine what is true. A premise statement (there can be more than one) is used...

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The Three Classical Laws of Logic

Warning! These are so obviously true that some people can't grasp them. The Three Classical Laws of Logic: The Law of Identity: every thing is the same with itself and different from another. (A is A and not ~A.) The word, "be," has a meaning different from the phrase, "not be." The word, "isn't," has...

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Is the Premise True?

Is the premise true? A statement may be known to be untrue. If someone tells you something that you know by sound logic and actual experience to be false, then it is false. However, your own logic may be flawed, or you may be interpreting your experience. For instance, certain theologies that use many Bible...

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Valid and Invalid Forms of Logic

A valid argument can have a false or inconclusive conclusion but only if one or more of the premises is false. 1. If the grass is green then the sky is blue. (fallacy, if the grass is green, the sky is not necessarily blue.) 2. The sky is blue (form is invalid but the premise...

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Axioms and Presuppositions

Presupposition/Axiom is an arbitrary assumption (all assumptions are arbitrary) that is treated as if it were a fact. (read) Naturalism/Atheism (read) Materialism/Atheism (read) Uniformitarianism (read) and Atheism/Humanism/Secularism (read) are very common. Axioms are often said to be self-evident, but there is not too much that actually is self-evident. In informal speech, self-evident often merely means obvious, but the definition...

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About Inductive Reasoning

In inductive reasoning, specific examples are used to make a general rule. In deductive reasoning it is a fallacy to allow the specific examples to take precedence over something that is generally true. It is usually impossible to put an actual percentage on the probability of something derived by induction. To say that something is...

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Language Plays a Key Role in Logic

Statements are declaritive. Propositions are the meanings of statements. For instance, the proposition is the whiteness of actual snow as opposed to the declarative statement, “Snow is white.” However, some people mean statement when they say proposition. Logic deals primarily with statements since propositions are difficult to deal with directly. Language plays a key role...

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Four Groupings of Arguments

Four groupings of arguments: All premises true & conclusion true (sound argument) All premises true & conclusion false Some or all premises false and conclusion true Some or all premises false and conclusion false

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